Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:56 pm

And the other half of summer.....

Spending time rebuilding an engine with no corners cut... well, one, but that was by accident. I did pay for it.

I had one of these for my Rabbit, but never for the 02J (5-speed) or 02M (6-speed).... that usually involved vice grips and screwdrivers. Enter the proper flywheel holder (not recommended for the crankshaft bolt). Easy to use and very effective.

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The new block code is "Grrrr".... no idea what it means, but it seems fitting.

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Nothing too exciting from the engine build point of view. Bored the block to accept the .5mm oversized piston (82.5mm vs the standard 82mm), new valve seals, new rings (naturally), and everything was cleaned and machined by http://www.rpmenginesvt.com (Georgia, VT)

Add on the transmission... my new favorite (and easy) way to install the transmission.... unless you have to bolt on the oil pan afterwards (where rotating the engine/trans as a single unit is a royal PITA).

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Something new that I am trying... and it led to another series of challenges... is the intake manifold Phenolic spacer. Now, what does Phenolic mean? It is a thermal do-hickey that prevents heat from the engine block from transmitting to the intake manifold. Reduce heat in the intake manifold means more power (there is a reason that we have FMICs!)..... or, it is really good marketing.

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One thing I noticed when taking apart the engine is that the fuel injectors were very loose in the injector cups. It was like throwing a hot dog down a hallway.

So, new injector cups were in order along with new rubber o-rings on the injectors.

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The kit from 034Motorsports also included longer intake manifold bolts and locking nuts. Shorter stock bolts vs. longer 034 bolts pictured.

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All assembled and pretty. While I was there, I had to oversize and tap the holes that held the fuel rail and throttle cable holder (another do-hickey) as the 7mm holes in the aluminum intake were less than threaded.

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Showing the thickness of the spacer. At least 300 more wHP, I figure. Throw in some stickers and that is 305 wHP more! Mother of God! (Super trooper reference)

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Sad part, the internet must have an end.... search for "Mother of God" and it just starts repeating on Google.

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Anyway, back at the ranch....

New challenge with the spacer is that the bracket that holds the intake manifold in place, something that I have not used for years, but figured the additional leverage from the extended mounting point with the spacer would warrant it, does not line up anymore. English teacher would have shot me for that terribly assembled sentence. Oh well.

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Also, at Ascutney #1 (2016), I dumped a bit of oil on my skid plate because the plastic oil dipstick was dislodged (or was never correct pushing into place). I haven't used the stock dipstick holder down do-hickey thing-ah-mabob for years. Something else I was going to solve while putting the engine back together.

Image of the stock holder-downer thingy. It is quite long as it holds various electronic bits, emissions VTAMs, blacks tubes, and other various things that I do not need. VTAM is an old IBM term for those of you playing the home game. I mounted the stock brace (that I had to grab from a junk car recently as I discarded mine years ago) to give me some ideas of what I could do. The right most bolt is currently in service holding the Kales Custom oil separator. I could use the stock bracket and the oil separator with the stock bolt, but all I needed was something simple to hold down a flimsy plastic tube. Enter Mr. Hacksaw and Mrs. Dremel.

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Longer bolt installed with aluminum spacer. I had to flatten out the brace a bit to extended it and then bend the end so that the bolt hole would align with the hole on the intake.

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Cut down the bracket for the dip stick....

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Now the trials and tribulations of cutting one corner (by accident). When rebuilding this engine, I used all new bolts (paying close attention to the TTY bolts). But.... I did not replace the front main seal aluminum plate. I did replace the seal, naturally, but generally, there is no reason to replace the plate.

Unless the bolt holes were stripped by whomever owned the engine previously.

No problem... one size up (7mm to 8mm) on the bolts.

Except, there just had to be a problem. The chuck on the drill would not clear the oil pan. I already applied the sealant to the block and pan and installed the other 18 pan bolts and torqued the three transmission to oil pan bolts. Didn't want to take it apart for the two holes that were stripped on the front main seal plate.

So, I needed to get a longer 17/64" drill bit (what is needed for a 8mm tap) or an extension for the drill. That's what she said!

I could not find a longer drill bit (it is Vermont, ya know), but I found a 12" extension that used two hex set screws to hold in the 1/4 drill bit.

Except mine is 17/64". Doh!

The short version, and three drill bits later, I had to brill a hole in the base of my drill press so that the 12" rod would be low enough to be able to drill into it, drill for a long time with cheap drill bits in hardened steel, and finally get the bit to work with the extension.

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Drilling one of the two holes....
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Worked out nicely with the tap as the tap handle that came with the kit did not hold onto the tap very well.

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Two 8mm non-TTY bolts holding the oil pan in place much better than the 7mm TTY bolts with threadless holes.

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Pretty exhaust side of the engine with new locking nuts. I really like the oblong nuts better than the split locking nuts.

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100% together (minus turbo).

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Sun Oct 09, 2016 11:37 pm

A little progress.... on the Scirocco!

I picked up a 1.8T AEB engine (block is 058.... intermediate shaft for external water pump), mainly because the Scirocco has an AEB and I figured it would be easier to work on the Scirocco if I had another engine that was exactly the same.

Then I got to looking at the new engine and realized it was quite different from the 06A that I run in the Golf. No biggy. I was not sure if the intermediate shaft was going to affect my plans for the engine build.

So.... just in case... since the junkyard had a 1.8T 06A block style engine for cheap (the 1.8Ts are getting old, so things are cheap, though, hard to come by), I grabbed it. There is still on more 1.8T in the yard.... in a Passat, though it was not an AEB.

Still planning to use the AEB head on the 06A block.

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Jumping into the Scirocco shortly after the Mt. Philo hillclimb.

Now on the Golf.... two issues that I have had with the Golf. She is a little slow (not too slow) building up the boost for short distances (corner to corner), but was great once it was full boost. AND.... the bolts on the hot side of the turbo would back out.

Enter the Tial 3652 and exit the Tial 6852 turbine housing.

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To address the potential for loose bolts, Joey at KalesCustom.com installed in SS bolts (pre-drilled holes for safety wire) and installed safety wire. So there!

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Putting the engine back in the Golf this week (maybe.... have to get ready for the Mt. Philo hillclimb.... sans the Golf) or next.

Then time to play with ideas for the Scirocco and start working on the engine.
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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Tue May 16, 2017 11:57 pm

Lots of updates... I had to organize the photos in folders/sub-folders just to apply some organization to the chaos.

Since I had a long winter to stare at the car to try to figure out some improvements, I jumped into it in November and ended up making a lot of changes, including one major project that I wish I never started.

Many months yielded only a weight savings of 16.2 pounds with the first phase of the project… removing the stock wiring harness for stuff I didn’t need... wasn’t worth it and wish I never started. More to come on that later after I work through the pictures to determine what is worth sharing.

So... I guess I will start somewhere in the middle as the beginning phase of the winter is long and very confusing.

Something simple. The Doors.

When I was putting the car together for the first time, I took what was currently there and modified (cut) it so that the stock door panel would work with the cage.

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I cut out the sections that interfered with the cage so that, when the door was closed, it looked good.

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Not that I expected a huge weight savings, I think the new modified door panels I did over the winter look better than the hacked up stock panels.

I started with the passenger door as it was easier to work with as it did not have window switches and the gas door/hatch switches. Yep… I still have power windows. The driver’s door is the mirror image of the passenger side so once I had a template, it was easy to duplicate for the other door.

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I picked up a roll of 22” wide by 10’ long 1/8” thick high density polyethylene plastic from www.SpeedwayMotors.com for $20 . Lots of other color options (black, light blue, dark blue, red, white, and yellow). I like the understated “black” though was tempted with red.

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I made some measurements on my high-tech concrete work surface (the floor)…

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Used a thick piece of aluminum flat stock as a cutting edge held in place by the typically bent tomato stake and bar clamps. A brand new blade in the utility knife was my friend.

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I purchased the world’s worst thread rivet nut insert tool available on the internet. It did not last the entire project and had to be disassembled at the end of each task just to get the threaded piece of the tool out of the pressed in threaded nut. I threw it away when done.

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The threaded rivet nuts that I used... 5mm I think.

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Installing one of many of the rivet nuts on the door.

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I used the top of the stock door panel as it had the door latch and provided some protection for the driver in regards to the top edge of the door.

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To hold the stock piece to the door, I made a simple bracket with a threaded rivet nut.

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I think it came out pretty good.

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Next… time for a door handle to close the door. Time to learn how my use the grommet tool that had very limited instructions (like which side of the grommet half goes towards the fabric).

Cutting hole (first attempt at strap)

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Lower part of die with half of the grommet

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Lightly tap it together

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Finished product (round 1)

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What I did discover is that the grommet would cut into the fabric when used as a door handle.

So I changed the design slightly for the driver’s side where I used three layers at the end and put the folded strap on top instead of the bottom. Seemed to work better.

Finished product…

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Now on to the driver’s side which proved to be a bit more difficult because of the lack of the correct tools (a vise only works as a metal brake with simple bends) and it seems my lack of visualizing an object in 3-D space. Damn monkey with a football.

The driver’s side door panel is not as flat as the passenger side so I had to made a support that went between the door panel and the plastic piece.

Anyway… it ain’t pretty so there is nothing to show. (sigh)

Driver’s door done and switches installed… more threaded rivet nuts to the rescue.

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Using the same 1/8” plastic, I made a piece in the footwell to protect the wires. The plastic was the perfect size to slide into the groove in the dead pedal.

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Probably too much information for what was a simple (albeit time consuming) project. It would have been sooooooo much easier in the summer as working with a roll of plastic in the winter is a pain. Hard to flatten it.

Enough for one update.

By the way… the car is currently at www.VEMS.us (Colchester, Vermont) awaiting its tune. Fingers crossed that everything works out.

Edit… while I was at it, I had to use the Command Prompt to change the file extensions from upper to lower case (used “Rename *.JPG *.jpg”) as the server is case-sensitive. Never a dull moment.
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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Mon May 29, 2017 6:37 pm

Next minor update... still avoiding the big "wiring removal" post.

Two things I wanted to accomplish with this change....

1. Clearer lens cover on the cluster
2. Fewer idiot lights since my ECU doesn't even know my car is running.

Cluster removed from dash and plastic cover removed

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Off with the needles

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The inside of the MK4 cluster. Thinking of my old Rabbit days, I thought this was going to be an exercise in removing some tiny light bulbs. Nope... tiny LEDs that are soldered into the electronic board.

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Tach held up to the light so that you can see the idiot light images.

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Plan B... electrical tape.

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Results...

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Speedometer before...

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And after...

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Scratched cover...

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Pretty!

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I just used headlight polish. Works quite well.

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Tue May 30, 2017 12:14 am

When trying to start the car after the "big wiring project" (that I wish I never started), the fuel pump would not turn on and the engine would not turn over.

Engine turn over was the clutch switch not installed yet. I was planning on circumventing this control and wasn't planning on installing it. Of course, I should have either followed through with that plan or installed it prior to trying to start the car.

Then there was the fuel pump that was not... well, pumping.

I followed the yellow wire from the fuse box on the driver's side, through the dash board, and out the hole in the fire wall to the rain tray. There sat the 034 relay board.

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It has fuses in it. I can seem them. But access was not possible without pulling back the heat shield, removing the nuts that held the relay board, and then taking the little screws out of the relay board to access the fuse.

I couldn't see me wanting to do that at an event should I blow a fuse.

I marked the wires (should have use a paint pen) and removed all the screws so that I could run the wires through the firewall.

There is my yellow wire (marked #3)... and the fuse that was blown.

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To reattach the heat shield, I picked up a safety wire twist pliers.... mixing "a" with a plural sounds funny. Can't have a pant or a plier. Easy to use and quite functional.

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I started with a piece of aluminum stock that mounted to one of the bolts that supports the dash and then used an exhaust clamp for the outside mounting point.

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Next, Bob at Vermont Custom Sheet Metal cut of a sheet of 090 aluminum plate for me. Seems the machine was a bit of an overkill for what I wanted. He didn't blink an eye when I asked him for the small sheet... I guess he has seen all sorts of requests over the years. The machine out back would cut a half-inch piece of steel. Don't get your fingers in that one.

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Plate in place... ran the wires through the 2.25" hole to determine placement of the 034EFC IIC ECU, 034 relay board, and the water injection system that I use to spray the radiator.

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Determined location and drilled mounting holes.

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Some Hammermill paint.

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Custom grommet made from wire loom and zipties... it works.

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Everything in place. If I was doing this from the start, I would have made all the wires the correct length. Large lip tires are holding the wires, not the ECU.

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Dash coming together.

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Glovebox door in place... I used an aluminum rod that goes through the gutted glovebox door and is held in place my the stock indentation where the factor latch goes. The rod is attached (VW part # Hose clamp) to the cage on the outside.

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And done...

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And... one good thing did come out of the fuse being blown on the relay board for the fuse pump. When pulling the relay board wires through the fire wall, I found a wire (went to GPO 0) that was less than healthy. Glad I found it now.

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Tue May 30, 2017 12:23 am

And to check something off my "to do" list for the day, some more photos.

Some of these are more for me to recall when I did something (who cares that I painted something or put fluid in something else?)

So... I painted the ceiling. I was going to replace the entire roof as I have a color-correct non-sunroof roof ready to install. Did not seem worth the effort. Instead, I painted over the mulit-color ceiling.

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Who the heck is "S. JONES" anyway? Don't know... figure I would have better luck with "Rabbit Farmer". Why not?

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Seems minor, but a "Euro Switch" has its benefits. I was not able to change it in the past because one of the tubes for the rollcage was in the way; when the dash was out I changed the switch. This switch allows me to turn off the headlights, which is nice when you have a dead battery and the headlights keep coming on when trying to start the car. The e-brake switch is supposed to do the same, but for some reason they still came on.

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I noticed that the transmission mount had a crack in it. I assume this was from when the dogbone broke at Okemo (2015?) allowing the engine to swing freely (and cause the throttle to get stuck).

I was going to take it apart and salvage the high density rubber for another mount, but I could not find one. Plenty of engine mounts, nothing for the transmission.

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Glad I decided to replace it because the entire backside was blown out.

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Enter a new set of "track density" 034EFI mounts. Now I have a spare engine mount.

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Broken mount and replacement.

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I put some fluid in something. Pentosin CHF 11S power steering fluid

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Time to address the steering wheel. Really, there was nothing wrong with the stock wheel as long as I was wearing my gloves. Without my gloves, it was a bit too smooth to ensure positive grip. Also, while it does not have any airbags, dealing with the airbag shell when I want to remove the steering wheel has always been a pain.

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Measured the dish.... 5 1/8"

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Sparco R-375 (360 mm diameter, 36mm dish, black suede, anodized black spokes, and 6 bolt mounting). Purchased from http://www.OGRacing.com

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And the Momo (part 8017) 6-bolt mounting hub (adapter for Volkswagen, Audi, and Porsche)

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Done... I did not get the quick release as my seats are on sliders.

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Now for a lesson in Cause and Effect and the realization that I haven't closed the hood on the car since July 2016 +/-.

I added the Phenolic spacer to the intake manifold (cause) and now I can't close the hood because the part of the throttle body is hitting the hood. I am guessing the ball mount on the top is related to cruise control... just a guess.

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First contact... with the hood

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Opps... won't close enough to install the hoodpins.

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Enter Mr. Dremel. I also adjusted the hoodpins at the same time to ensure the hood was at the same level as the fenders.

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I used the cigarette lighter to charge my phone and camera. Then I came across a USB version that just made sense. I removed the stock lighter (thread body with nut on back), opened up the hole a little bit with the Dremel, and installed the USB ports. Nice.

Now I just need to find the little red coin tray that goes next to it. Somewhere in my garage, I hope.

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This was actually the last thing I did to my car (yep, I know there is that whole unexciting "big wiring project" update that is still to come) before it was off to the dyno.

Started and ran great.

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The Brake warning light is blinking and an occasional audible warning. Fluid level is fine. Borrowed a buddy's (Chris / vtgti) OBD2 scanner (Vgate Scan) and tablet to determine what codes the stock ECU could provide... nothing brake related.

Oh well, everything seems to work fine.

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Thu Jun 01, 2017 7:38 am

Posting up more recent info in advance to the dreaded "big wiring project" update.

Tuning at www.VEMS.us in Colchester, VT... they also just hired someone (Nick) who tunes Subarus!

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Results: 335.9 wHP and 318.8 wTQ.

My goal was to move the power band down in the RPMs to give me more low end TQ. Surprisingly, it gave me a lot more TQ and HP, lower TQ RPM, and less boost!

From Jason (VEMS):
"The peak torque from before is matched 500 RPM sooner, but still climbs. At 4500 RPM (peak torque) it's almost 100 ft-lb ore than last time.
Now at 16 PSI boost instead of 20 PSI and I did take a bit of timing out of the top end because it didn't affect torque, so power timing is better"

What does this say? More power at the low end, more TQ overall, and a great tuner that is paying attention to things to ensure a good and safe tune. And he is local!

(the little spike to 350 wHP is due to the RPM pickup on the dyno)

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First event of the year is at the SLMP track in New York; had a great time in the Subaru WRX, but it rained all weekend.

First hillclimb of the year is the New England Hillclimb Association (NEHA) Mt. Ascutney hillclimb sponsored by the Sports Car Club of New Hampshire.

Had a great time and the weather was great.

Make sure you select 1080 HD for video quality.



Here is a side by side from Ascutney #1 in 2016 (top) and 2017 (bottom)

(Top) 2016 2:56.10 | 302.4 wHP and 275.1 wTQ
(Bottom) 2017 2:57.79 | 335.9 wHP and 318.8 wTQ

Runs seem pretty much the same. A little slower in 2017, but many factors can play into the time difference, so I would call them pretty much the same. I think Okemo (more of a power hill) will show the difference in TQ in HP much better than the bumpy Ascutney.

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Sat Jun 03, 2017 1:12 am

Trying something new.

I sent the broken axle (broke half way up the Ascutney hillclimb.... kinda in the straight) back to DriveShaft Shop (DSS). The outer CV join on the passenger axle broke.... it always seems to be this axle and this CV.

I am waiting to hear back from DSS.

In the meantime, since I have heard a lot of success stories with Raxle, I contacted them via e-mail.

Immediate response via e-mail that prompted a little back and forth conversation with Marty... the person from the e-mail... asking me to give him a call so that we could discuss options.

First, I have to say I really enjoyed talking with Marty. Down to earth.

After discussing my challenges with axles, the hills, the bumps, the power.... I ordered a set of race Raxles from Marty.

What does Raxles have to offer:
I haven't tested them yet, but based on our conversation, a superior axle
Great customer service based on my experience
Race axles (as opposed to their street axles) guaranteed for life (I pay shipping both ways) even with racing! (big selling point.... Marty said he hopes he never hears from me)

Based on personality and customer service, I highly recommend Raxle.

Now, the major decision point will be how they hold up with racing on the rough roads where lifting a tire, under power, in a corner is very common.

We will see.

And... I spoke with him late this afternoon and already have a UPS tracking number, which means they are on their way. Sweet!
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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:58 am

I keep breaking the passenger side axles.... I believe this is because it is longer and there is more leverage applied to the outer joint (the part that keeps breaking).

Why don't I fix the problem to remove the longer axle from the equation. Good idea.

Epiphany!

My plan was to get into the Scirocco right after the Mount Washington Hillclimb in July.

But, it might be time to jump into it now as the Scirocco has an intermediate shaft setup so that the axles on the car are equal length.

I figure this is something that I could copy for the Golf.

Hmmmm......

But, in the meantime, while the DriveShaft Shop (DSS) axle is back with DSS for repair, I looked at other axle options.

Naturally, I ended up on Raxles website (http://www.raxles.com/) and had a conversation with Marty to hammer out what I needed.

The axles arrived yesterday.

I was very impressed with the boxes and overall packaging. Yep, seems immaterial as the quality of the axles is all that truly matters, but it was definitely bonus points.

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The axles seem very solid and well constructed.

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All new hardware with idiot proof instructions. Bonus!

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Re: Project: 2001 1.8T Golf IV

Post by Rabbit Farmer » Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:29 pm

Okemo hillclimb was a lot of fun.

We had some technical issues on Saturday morning (a perfect storm) where everyone came together to find a solution. Great event!

Because Okemo (very fast hill) is the event prior to the Subaru Mt. Washington Hillclimb on July 7-9, 2017 (aka "Climb to the Clouds"), I decided to put the car in the trailer after two runs on Sunday to make sure I did not do anything stupid.

There is a bit more time in the car... apparent because I noticed many places where I could have driven soooo much better. Wished there was an Undo button on the dash to redo the previous corner. Oh, well, next year.

My top speed in the straight was 113 mph on Sunday. I think my speed was 118 mph in the past (if memory serves), but I am sure it is slower because of the smaller hot side turbo. It was not from lack of trying.

Video from Okemo... New GoPro5. Used the GPS to map the track, get speed (wasn't close after check 7, but dead on in straight per the radar gun), and used the GoPro "Quik" editor. Simple, but clunky, and I am unsure if I can add any photos, etc. for intro screen. Still learning how to use it.

Recorded at 1080 dpi and 120 fps. Doesn't "wow" me on the quality on my computer, but it might be excellent on the TV. I might have to reduce the fps to get some of the detail for the fast sections.

Frustrated with the phone interface so far... was able to connect at home, but after I powered it off using the app, I could not connect again. Menu is a bit clunky for using wifi. Could be simpler.

I'm sure my lack of experience with the new camera played into it also. I will find an expert (my lovely wife Julie) to figure it all out for me.

Video will be available soon... it is taking a while to upload and process. Youtube tells me it will be available here:



A friend of mine in Canada (Ralph) drew the Rabbit Farmer Racing image for me. I added the text to the wheel to personalize it a bit. A Youtube video crash course on how to use Adobe Illustrator was in order. I got through it... looking forward to the other toys in AI. I am very familiar with the basics of Photoshop, so this is a very different world.

I have ordered a bunch of these shirts (long and short) in pink (for the wife), dark green (color of the car) and black (just because).

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Coming soon... actually, next week, Climb to the Clouds. The official credentials arrived. Good thing they spelled my name correctly. ;)

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It takes hundreds of nuts to hold a car together, but it takes only one of them to scatter it all over the highway. - Evan Esar

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